Here’s Why We Adore This Minimalist Villa In Hellerup – HarpersBazaarArabia

An exquisite villa in Hellerup, situated north of Copenhagen, measuring 240 square metres was built in 1921 and it is not your typical Danish home. 

Colours, texture, art and decoration are an incredibly important part of the lives of Martensen-Larse and Blanche. There is an atmosphere that makes the home personal, with its rigorous architecture forming a beautiful frame.

Dining table- PK54 af Poul Kjærholm. Chairs, CH33 Carl Hansen & Søn. Curtains, Plain Moire, Helene Blanche/ TAPET-CAFE

Both are drawn to colours, material compositions and skilful craftsmanship, which were the starting points when designing the home as well as when designing a space or residence for customers in their working lives. The colours have been carefully handpicked to complement the many works of art, furniture and designs featured in abode.

Walk In closet/ Kvänum / colour Hardwick White. Wallpaper Polka Stripe/ Helene Blanche

Martensen-Larse and Blanche dreamt of a décor with an expressive, avant-garde and evocative visual expression and brought their vision to life from their shared fascination of deep, insistent colours.

They can’t run from the fact that they have some Danish minimalism rooted in their choice of style, but the most important elements for them is a style that is  dynamic and vibrant – somehow very un-Danish. “You find lots of objects, art, design, books, things and things, all of which bridge our work with interior design, colours and textile design,” they share. “Telling stories with the spaces we create will always follow us as humans.”

Bespoke Kitchen/ Kvänum. Chair, CH33 Carl Hansen & Søn

TAPET-CAFE, established in 1974, is a second-generation Danish interior design house specialising in bespoke printed textiles and wallpaper. The company has decorated walls and created interior design for years: from exquisite wallpaper, custom-made curtains and fine paint colours to hand-printed textile and fine upholstery. Their clients include private homes as well as designer shops, restaurants, boutique hotels and design collaborations. TAPET-CAFE is a purveyor to .

Blanche is a Danish textile designer and her collections are sold exclusively at Tapet-Cafe in Denmark and from a selection of handpicked international showrooms, particularly in Paris, London, Stockholm, Moscow and Sydney. Blanche holds a degree in textile design from Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London. 

Mobile- Kirstine Roepsdorff

All photographs by Kate Lewis

Production by Robert Meeder


From Harper’s Bazaar Arabia Interiors Winter 2019 issue

5 benefits of living a minimalist lifestyle – Free Malaysia Today


A clean, clutter free home celebrates space. (decorationchannel.co pic)

Minimalism is a growing trend around the world. Apart from its soft, airy aesthetics, minimalism is healthy for the soul because it is a lifestyle that teaches you to be contented with what you have, instead of always craving for what you don’t need.

It teaches you to appreciate the bare basics and to enjoy a clean, clutter-free home that celebrates space. Being a minimalist unlocks a whole new world of benefits:

1. Less is more

The minute you commit yourself to a minimalist lifestyle, you need to cut back on your material possessions.

That means no more splurging on new furniture on a whim. A clean and organised home also means you don’t have to worry about having clutter everywhere or misplacing your things because everything will be where you need it to be.

A minimalist living room is clean and organised. (pinterest.com pic)

2. You can save money

The less you spend, the more you have! Isn’t that great? In a way, minimalism does encourage thriftiness especially in shopaholics.

So if you’re an impulse shopper, your bank account will definitely benefit from this exercise.

A clutter-free home allows for more freedom in movement. (contemporist.com pic)

3. Hooray for more freedom

Minimalism may seem like a restrictive lifestyle, but it actually promises much more financial freedom.

Your bank account can finally breathe, instead of being anchored down by credit card bills and bank loans.

A tidy and clutter-free home also allows for more freedom in movement, because you won’t be tripping over things or accidentally banging your toe against something.

Minimalism focuses on the basics and eliminates clutter. (pinterest.com pic)

4. Create room for important things

The minute you decide to purge, you’ll realise how much extra space you have in your home for more important things.

Sometimes, when your judgement is clouded by all these material items, you lose sight of what’s important. Adopting the minimalist lifestyle brings you back to the basics so you can focus on what truly makes you happy.

Life will be simpler and happier after de-cluttering. (designmag.fr pic)

5. Renewed satisfaction

The art of de-cluttering is a magical one. After clearing up your home, you’ll be surprised that a huge burden has been lifted off your shoulders.

This then turns into joy and happiness because the mess and clutter around your house is now gone. It is truly amazing how different life can be when you purge your home and turn your life around to living minimally. Try it out.

Minimalism takes you back to the basics and makes you focus on the most important things in your life.

If you need help getting started on de-cluttering your home, check professional online services where dedicated cleaners and movers will be happy to help you on this journey at affordable, fixed rates.

This article first appeared in Kaodim.

One of Southeast Asia’s fastest growing local services platform, Kaodim connects users to dependable and professional local service providers – fast and hassle-free. With the Kaodim app, users can access professional services for home renovation, office cleaning, and much more.

Kanye West, Ikea: The world is turning to wabi-sabi (VIDEO) – Malay Mail


From Ikea’s new February catalogue. — Picture courtesy of Ikea via AFP

LOS ANGELES, Feb 17 — Kim Kardashian and Kanye West opened the doors of their California villa to the readers of Architectural Digest, causing yet another media frenzy. The areas of the home that were shown are evocative of a modern cloister with muted colours and minimal decoration.

The home was created with assistance from interior designer Axel Vervoordt and architect Claudio Silvestrin and draws on “wabi-sabi,” a philosophy and aesthetic concept imported from Japan.

A video posted last year on Vogue‘s YouTube channel offered a walk-through of the family’s home.

In his seminal 1994 book, Wabi-Sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers, American architect Leonard Koren says of the Japanese concept that it is “the most conspicuous and characteristic feature of traditional Japanese beauty and it occupies roughly the same position in the Japanese pantheon of aesthetic values as do the Greek ideals of beauty and perfection in the far West.”

The quintessential Japanese aesthetic, wabi-sabi “is a beauty of things imperfect, impermanent and incomplete. It is a beauty of things modest and humble. It is a beauty of things unconventional.”

The principles of wabi-sabi were first described by tea ceremony master and Zen Buddhist monk Murata Shuko.

Born in the 15th century at a time when tea ceremonies were sumptuous affairs making extensive use of luxury objects imported from China, Shuko chose to follow an alternative aesthetic that privileged local objects and crafts.

His work was continued by another tea ceremony master, Rikyu, who went a step further by using tiny peasant cabins as tea houses.

Put simply, wabi-sabi proposes an appreciation of imperfections in everyday objects, patinas that come with age, and objects that have been broken and repaired. As such, it is an increasingly popular aesthetic very much in tune with minimalism, which invites us to set aside all that is superfluous.

The trend is now exerting a growing influence on furniture makers, even Ikea. In its February catalogue, which offers such novelties as seagrass lampshades and and craft-inspired kitchenware, the brand announces: “This season is about living a conscious and mindful lifestyle that is close to nature. Whether you are living in the countryside or the city, you can bring nature to the home with a bit of greenery and a wabi-sabi attitude.”

Ikea is not alone. On the vintage design web-market Selency, fans of this trend can also search for age-worn, crafted, and minimalist objects under the key word “wabi-sabi.”

On close examination, wabi-sabi is not far removed from minimalism, another trend that is all the rage. It’s notably identified with the ultra-famous “queen of decluttering,” Marie Kondo.

You might even say that decorative asceticism is the new norm, but be warned: embracing austere aesthetics will not necessarily make home decoration lighter on your wallet. As an example, Ms Kondo’s website nonchalantly offers tea containers at US$200 (RM828) a throw.

As for the West-Kardashians, you should know that Kanye sold his Maybach to buy Kim an original Jean Royere Polar Bear sofa. At the end of the day, we all have to make sacrifices. — AFP-Relaxnews

Sunday “Gayle on the Go!” /// Sunday, February 16th, 2020 – KTLA Los Angeles

-000-

Gray Whale Watching
Captain Dan Salas
Harbor Breeze Cruises
100 Aquarium way, Dock #2
Long Beach, CA 90802
(562) 983-6880

Gray Whale Watching
Captain Dave’s Dolphin & Whale Watching
24440 Dana Point Harbor Drive
Dana Point
949 577 8154
DolphinSafari.com

The Gray Whale Migration season is underway! We can see it right off the California coast! As the Alaskan waters begin to freeze over their food supply migrates to warmer climates these large marine animals also begin their trip to warmer tropical climates. During this migration trip the Gray Whale travels at an average speed of around 5 mph for two to three months until it reaches its destination in the warm waters of Mexico.
Harbor Breeze Cruises in Long Beach and Captain Dave’s Dolphin & Whale Watching Tours in Dana Point offer whale watching tours. For ticket information go to 2seewhales.com for Harbor Breeze Cruises information and dolphinsafari.com for Captain Dave’s Dolphin and Whale Watching information.

-0-

Open House @ 11am
Marine Mammal Care Center Los Angeles
3601 South Gaffey Street
San Pedro
mmccla.org

At present, MMCC Los Angeles has only the funds to pay its hardworking veterinary and animal care staff through June 2020. In order to guarantee operations through Seal and Sea Lion seasonal migration, which is the Center’s next busy season (January – June 2021), they MUST raise one-million-dollars by July 1, 2020. If they do not meet this fundraising minimum, they will be forced to close their doors and transfer any remaining animals to out of area hospitals, leaving no 24/7 facility in Los Angeles County to take in animals that strand.

-0-

The NEW American Cancer Society Discovery Shop
5 Points Plaza
18597 Main Street
Huntington Beach
1-714-375-1737

Don’t call this a thrift shop! Call it an upscale retail outlet of donated quality items available for not a lot of money. This is the brand new American Cancer Society Discovery Shop in Huntington Beach.

Proceeds from the sales at this beautiful and well stocked shop allows the American Cancer Society to pay for research and the care of families coping with cancer. The Huntington Beach store is open seven days a week.

-0-

2020 Los Angeles Travel & Adventure Show
West Hall
Los Angeles Convention Center
1201 South Figueroa Street
Los Angeles
TravelShows.com

At “America’s Favorite Travel Show,”, you can:
 Explore endless vacation options
 Plan your trip face-to-face with thousands of travel experts right on the show floor
 Meet travel celebrities Samantha Brown, Rick Steves, Peter Greenberg and Pauline Frommer
 Immerse yourself in faraway cultures with song and dance on the Global Beats Stage
 Discover over 350+ destinations from around the globe
 Attend dozens of educational seminars on the Savvy Traveler and Destination Theaters
 Enjoy fun for the whole family with virtual reality, zorb balls and SCUBA lessons in the dive pool
 Save BIG with exclusive show-only specials and trip giveaways

-0-

Passport Fair
West Hall
Los Angeles Convention Center
1201 South Figueroa Street
Los Angeles
877 487 2778
usps.com/passport
travel.state.gov/passport

To help speed up the process at this special event, customers should fill out forms ahead of time. Application forms and information on the costs and how to apply for a passport book and/or passport card can be found at usps.com/passport or travel.state.gov/passport. Customers can also obtain passport information by phone, in English and Spanish, by calling the National Passport Information Center toll-free at (877) 487-2778.

To apply for a passport, applicants need a valid form of photo identification and proof of citizenship.

Proof of identification — You may submit items such as the following containing your signature and a photograph that is a good likeness of you: Current or previous U.S. passport, naturalization certificate, certificate of citizenship or a current and valid driver’s license, government ID or military ID.
**A photocopy of the identification – front and back – must be submitted with your passport application. Many post offices do provide photocopy service for an added fee.

Proof of citizenship includes any one of the following:
1. Certified birth certificate issued by the city, county, or state
2. Naturalization certificate or certificate of citizenship, and
3. An expired passport
Passport application fees can be made payable to “Dept. of State.”
The passport photo payment and $35.00 acceptance fee can be made with cash, debit/credit card, personal check or money order payable to “USPS”. Please note that there will be no money orders sold at this event.

-0-

“Hidden Figure ” : Black History Month
Photographer John Simmons, ASC
Emmy Award Winner
“No Crystal Stair”
Museum of African American Art
Macy’s 3rd Floor, Baldwin Hills Crenshaw
4005 Crenshaw Boulevard
Los Angeles
323 294 7071
Maaala.org

“Hidden Figure”: Emmy Award Winning Photographer John Simmons, ASC. He has a special museum exhibit of his photography entitled “No Crystal Stair: The Photography of John Simmons.”
John Simmons, ASC studied fine art at Fisk University and Cinematography at the University of California, USC. He has been a member of The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) since 2004. He presently serves as one of the ASC vice presidents. John has been behind the camera since the early seventies. He started in documentaries working with film director Carlton Moss who became his mentor in college. Later his career led him to shooting and directing commercials, music videos with a spectrum of artists: Stevie Wonder, Britney Spears, Snoop Dogg and so many others. Simmons has been on the faculty at UCLA teaching cinematography and influencing and guiding the careers of students for more than twenty years.

His introduction to television began with movies of the week. The Killing Yard, The Ruby Bridges Story, Selma, Lord, Selma. He has shot number of documentaries for PBS, Showtime, and HBO.

His first multi-camera prime time show was The Hughleys.

This began a prominent career in multi-camera sitcoms. The Tracy Morgan Show, All of Us, The Jonas Brothers, Men at Work, A Dog With a Blog, as well as many pilots. Simmons has received three Primetime Emmy nominations, twice for the Disney series Pair of Kings – the first for a children’s show in the cinematography category (2011 and 2012). In 2016 he won a Primetime Emmy for Outstanding Cinematography for the show Nicky, Ricky, Dicky & Dawn. John is currently shooting the NETFLIX series “Family Reunion.”
Museum of African American Art
Macy’s 3rd Floor, Baldwin Hills Crenshaw
4005 Crenshaw Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90008
323-294-7071
Maaala.org

-0-

“Hidden Figure”
U.S. Navy Sailor Doris “Dorrie” Miller
Pearl Harbor Hero
Navy Cross Recipient
“Fighting on the Home Front”
Heroes Hall OC Fair & Event Center
88 Fair Drive
Costa Mesa
714 708 1500
ocfair.com/event

It’s Black History Month! In Costa Mesa at Heroes Hall, learn about “Hidden Figure” U.S. Navy Sailor Doris “Dorrie” Miller. He manned anti-aircraft guns during the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 for which he had no training and tended to the wounded. His heroic acts garnered the Navy Cross, the third highest honor awarded by the Navy at the time. He was the first African American to receive the special medal and special recognition.
Nearly two years after Pearl Harbor, he was killed in action when his ship Liscome Bay was sunk by a Japanese submarine during the Battle of Makin.
January 19, 2020, the U.S. Navy announced that the U.S. Navy Aircraft Carrier CVN-81 will be named after him. It’s a Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier scheduled for construction in 2023 and launched in 2028.

-0-

Oscar Oiwa: Dreams of a Sleeping World
USC Pacific Asia Museum
46 North Los Robles Avenue
Pasadena
626 787 2680
pacificasiamuseum.usc.edu

The exhibition is an immersive dreamscape dome which includes exhibited artworks the public is invited to enter into and become part of this new Oiwa Dreamscape. Installed at the USC Pacific Asia Museum, the inflatable artwork required two weeks of work and 120 sharpie markers, as Oiwa draws alongside his artisan assistant and four MFA students from USC. Complimenting this immersive experience is a dynamic installation of Oiwa’s large scale paintings shedding light on his surrealist and imaginative dreamscapes.
Oscar Oiwa is a Japanese artist born in 1965 in São Paulo, Brazil. Now an American citizen, Oiwa lives and works in New York City. Oiwa graduated from the School of Architecture and Urbanism in São Paulo in 1989 and was influenced by comics and illustration from an early age. He is known for his giant canvases and large frescoes. Oiwa has exhibited internationally and his work is included in renowned private and public collections.

By the way, don’t forget to stop by the museum’s gift shop to treat yourself to a souvenir of your experience and your visit!

-0-

“Hidden Figure”
U.S. Navy Sailor Doris “Dorrie” Miller
Pearl Harbor Hero
Navy Cross Recipient
“Fighting on the Home Front”
Heroes Hall
OC Fair & Event Center
88 Fair Drive
Costa Mesa
714 708 1500
ocfair.com/event

It’s Black History Month! In Costa Mesa at Heroes Hall, learn about “Hidden Figure” U.S. Navy Sailor Doris “Dorrie” Miller. He manned anti-aircraft guns during the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 for which he had no training and tended to the wounded. His heroic acts garnered the Navy Cross, the third highest honor awarded by the Navy at the time. He was the first African American to receive the special medal and special recognition.
Nearly two years after Pearl Harbor, he was killed in action when his ship Liscome Bay was sunk by a Japanese submarine during the Battle of Makin.
January 19, 2020, the U.S. Navy announced that the U.S. Navy Aircraft Carrier CVN-81 will be named after him. It’s a Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier scheduled for construction in 2023 and launched in 2028.

-0-

“Hidden Information”
The Jenkins Bus
Petersen Automotive Museum
6060 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles
323 964 6331

Sometimes when we appreciate old buildings or items, we wishfully think to ourselves, “Oh, imagine the stories that could tell.” Just seeing the picture of this 1966 Volkswagen Type 2 Bus brings such thoughts to me. Honored by the title “The Jenkins Bus”, the rusty, worn out vehicle cemented itself in history, collecting experiences while performing extraordinary duties. If you’re curious about the stories this van could tell, luckily the Petersen Museum had a few special guests in attendance that provided some insight.

On Saturday, February 8, the Petersen Museum hosted an event detailing the role this bus had in South Carolina. “The Jenkins Bus” was used by Esau and Janie B. Jenkins on John’s Island, South Carolina, to transport fellow African Americans to Charleston. The goal of these trips was to seek improved education, better jobs, and the chance at truly living the American dream. The discussion panel was comprised of three members from the Jenkins family (Elaine Jenkins, Jelani Jenkins and David Grimball), as well as Petersen Director of Education and Programming Jason Hartwig. The Historic Vehicle Association Curator, Casey Maxon and Machelle Williams, Sr. Director, Diversity and Corporate Social Responsibility were also a part of the panel.

The VW Type 2 bus will be on display at the Petersen until June 2020.

-0-

Closing Today!
Free!
“Hidden Location” : Black History Month
39th Annual Black Doll Show: Psychedollia
William Grant Still Arts Center
2520 South West View Street
Los Angeles
323 734 1165
wgsac.wordpress.com

Artists Adah Glenn and Patricia Shivers are among more than a dozen artists who have created special Black for the “39th Annual Black Doll Show: Psychedollia” at the William Grant Stills Arts Center in South Los Angeles, the longest running display of Black dolls in Los Angeles.

The Black Doll Show at The William Grant Still Arts Center was started in 1980 by the Friends of William Grant Still Arts Center, with artist Cecil Fergerson as its first curator. Inspired by the “Black Doll Test” conducted in the 1940s by pioneering psychologists Mamie and Kenneth Clark that concluded that many African-American children preferred playing with white dolls over black dolls, The Black Doll Show at the Center is the longest-running display of black dolls in Los Angeles. Collectors and doll artists return time and time again to offer dolls from their collections that fit with the year’s theme. At its root, it is a time for community to come together to celebrate the collections and contributions each individual has made to doll making and collecting over the years.

-0-

12)
Closing Today!
Shirin Neshat I Will Greet The Sun Again
The Broad
221 South Grand Avenue
Los Angeles

Originated by The Broad, Shirin Neshat: I Will Greet the Sun Again is the largest exhibition to date of internationally acclaimed artist Shirin Neshat’s approximately 30-year career. Taking its title from a poem by Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad, the exhibition (which presents approximately 230 photographs and eight video works) offers a rare glimpse into the evolution of Neshat’s artistic journey as she explores topics of exile, displacement, and identity with beauty, dynamic formal invention, and poetic grace.
Beginning with her early photograph series, Women of Allah, the exhibition also features iconic video works such as Rapture, Turbulent, and Passage, monumental photography installations including The Book of Kings and The Home of My Eyes, and Land of Dreams, a new, ambitious work encompassing a body of photographs and two immersive videos that will make its global debut in the exhibition.

-0-

Pan African Film Festival & Arts Festival
Cinemark 15
Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza
4020 Marlton Avenue
Los Angeles
310 337 4737

The PAN AFRICAN FILM FESTIVAL LOS ANGELES showcases more than 150 new quality films and more than 100 fine artists and unique craft people from all over the world now through Sunday, February 23rd.

-0-

Free!
Cross Colours: Black Fashion in the 20th Century
California African American Museum
600 State Drive
Los Angeles
213 744 7432
caamuseum.org
Lead actor Will Smith wore bold colors and geometric looks on the hit television show “THE FRESH PRINCE OF BEL AIR. The wardrobe was designed by the Los Angeles based urban apparel line Cross Colors. The brand became hugely popular.
This is the first exhibition to examine the groundbreaking work of African American owners Carl Jones and T.J. Walker.
The California African American Museum — Cross Colours: Black Fashion in the 20th Century — exhibition is free!

-0-

Free!
Timothy Washington: Citizen/Ship
California African American Museum
600 State Drive
Los Angeles
213 744 7432
caamuseum.org

Also at the California African American Museum CITIZEN/SHIP by Los Angeles based artist Timothy Washington. His creativity speaks to both the positive and negative aspects of American culture.

-0-

Chip Ganassi Racing: Fast Tracks to Success
Charles Nearburg Family Gallery
Petersen Automotive Museum
6060 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles
Petersen.org/Ganassi

There is a new exhibition at the Petersen Automotive Museum. CHIP GANASSI RACING: FAST Among the ten Ganassi cars here, the 2016 24 Hours of Le Mans winning Ford GT and more.
Regardless of the form of competition, it would be difficult to describe Chip Ganassi Racing without using superlatives. It is the only team to win the Indianapolis 500 (four times), the Brickyard 400, the Rolex 24-Hours of Daytona (seven times), the 12 Hours of Sebring, and the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the last victory especially meaningful because the team won with the newest Ford mid-engine GT, marking the 50th anniversary of Ford’s first Le Mans win. Adding to the prestige, it is also the only team to win the 24 Hours of Daytona three consecutive times and the only team owner to win the Rolex 24, the Daytona 500, the Indy 500, and the Brickyard 400 in one twelve-month span.
Today the Ganassi Racing teams are comprised of two cars in each of four series: NTT IndyCar, Monster Energy NASCAR Cup, IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, and FIA World Endurance Championship. In 2012 Ganassi was ranked 17th among the “50 most influential people in the Auto Industry” by Complex Magazine. Vital partnerships with Credit One Bank, Monster Energy, Cessna, and others attest to the high profile success of the Duquesne University graduate. Raw numbers do not tell the entire story, but a record of 16 championships and 200 outright victories in events that span the spectrum of motorsports speaks to what can be achieved with skill, perseverance and team founder Chip Ganassi’s organizational talent.

Learn more about the long list of Chip Ganassi historic racing victories and vehicles at the Petersen Automotive Museum, open seven days a week.

-0-

“Alternating Currents: The Rise and Fall of Electric Vehicles ”
Petersen Automotive Museum
6060 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles
323 964 6331

At the Petersen Automotive Museum, we learn interest in electric vehicles dates back to…the 1900s!
Wow! Who knew? We can learn about the 1915 Detroit Electric as well as what led to the decline and the current renewed interest in electric vehicles at the Petersen Automotive Museum exhibit “ALTERNATING CURRENTS: THE RISE AND FALL OF ELECTRIC VEHICLES.
Fascinating!

-0-

Disruptors
Petersen Automotive Museum
6060 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles
323 964 6331
Petersen.org

Having adopted the fundamental principles of reductionism, designer Rem D Koolhaas and industrial designer Joey Ruiter apply a minimalist approach to the look of conventional objects in independently conceived, yet complementary ways. Both Koolhaas and Ruiter share a self-imposed mandate to strip all expectation of conformity from products ranging in scope from footwear and furniture to automobiles and motorcycles. Yet while their goals are shared, they pursue them through their own respective companies, United Nude and J. Ruiter.
Seizing an opportunity to create (and then cater to) a growing demand among enlightened, progressive consumers for the sophistication of simplicity, Koolhaas and Ruiter have eschewed a traditional design approach and in doing so left themselves free to mold familiar objects in unexpected ways. A happy byproduct of such a practice, their simple designs also obviate many of the production problems that one would expect to encounter had the objects been more traditionally complex.
Together, Koolhaas and Ruiter jointly expose the barriers posed by currently accepted manufacturing methods, which have resulted from binary conceptualizations of production (form versus function), costs (time versus money), and resources (labor versus materials). By eliminating gratuitous complexity, they have imbued their creations with a technical sophistication that could not have been achieved otherwise. Deliberately titled Disruptors, the Petersen Automotive Museum exhibition presents the works of two designers whose markedly different approaches upend the norm by superimposing technology and art on one another.

-0-

*Hollywood Dream Machines
*Disruptors
Petersen Automotive Museum
6060 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles
323 964 6331
Petersen.org

“Hollywood Dream Machines” is the largest sci-fi vehicle exhibit in the world.
“Disruptors” features the work designer Rem D Koolhaas and industrial designer Joey Ruiter and their minimalist approach to the look of conventional objects by stripping all expectation of conformity from products ranging in scope from footwear and furniture to automobiles and motorcycles.

-0-

Building an Electric Future: The Technology of Today for the Vehicles of Tomorrow.
Production Gallery
6060 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles

Throughout much of its 80+ year history, Volkswagen has exerted a profound influence on both the automotive industry and car culture. Its Beetle brought affordable mobility to tens of millions, and its utilitarian Transporter became an unwitting icon for an entire generation, representing freedom, pleasure and pacifism. As the world’s most prolific car maker, VW stands to alter the automotive landscape yet again by building only electric cars by 2026, an initiative that begins in earnest with the introduction of its electric “I.D.” model in 2019.
Through experiences both physical and virtual, visitors will come to learn how MEB-based vehicles were conceived, the variety of models that will be built, the uniquely flexible nature of the platform, and how the cars will be assembled. The exhibition will explore what it takes to strategize, design, test, construct, and utilize the products of an electrified automotive future.

-0-

The Lost Corvettes Sweepstakes
thelostcorvettes.com

Learn about the Corvette Heroes of the New York real estate families Heller and Spindler, and the co-owner of the Gotham Comedy Club, Chris Mazzilli.
They have a 36 unique collection of iconic Corvettes, one each year– starting from 1953, the year when the Corvette was introduced, to 1989. The collection of all 36 cars is considered the greatest car find in history.
The 36 Corvettes were “rescued” after being housed in New York City parking garages for nearly 25 years. They fell into disrepair being un-driven and left to collect dust and debris.
In 1989, the collection was part of a VH1 promotional contest; it is often referred to as the Peter Max Collection. Max purchased the cars from the winner of the VH1 contest right after the drawing. Max, a Pop Artist known for his elaborate use of color, had planned on using the Corvettes as canvases for a project. But he never did, and the cars sat. The Corvette Heroes now own the cars and are restoring all 36 under the expertise of Mazzilli at Dream Car Restoration in Hicksville, NY (Long Island). Upon completion, the group will offer all 36 Corvettes in a national sweepstakes. Want to win one? Go to the lostcorvettes.com or .
You can buy ONE ticket for $3 or use the KTLA promo code for multiple ticket packages. Winners will be announced in May of 2020.
The Lost Corvettes is a new docu-series that follows the unique history and restoration of 36 classic cars.

-0-

HOW TO GET ON THE “GAYLE ON THE GO” list!:
PLEASE SEND YOUR INFORMATION TO: Gayle.Anderson@KTLA.com Please be sure to provide at least one minute of broadcast quality video or at least six broadcast quality images or photos that illustrate your event with your request. The deadline for your information is EVERY Tuesday 5pm.

Don’t forget you can always post your information on the KTLA Community Calendar. Here’s the link:

-000-

I’ve Been Plastic-Free for 6 Years—Here’s What I Use Instead – msnNOW

© Courtesy Stephanie Seferian, The Sustainable Minimalists Podcast

When I was five, I’d follow my mom around the house and turn off light switches behind her. You could say that I’ve always been a bit eco-friendly, but it wasn’t until I had my first daughter that I became serious about it. I’d read about climate change and how bad plastic was—and how overfilled our landfills are—but at that moment, it became about more than myself. I decided that I had to do all that I could to help, even if it was as small as making less trash. Surprisingly, it’s not all that hard to produce less waste.

Over time, I gradually weeded out the items in our household that I felt were contributing to the overall plastic problem. I created The Sustainable Minimalist, a podcast, and the Mama Minimalist website to encourage and coach other families on how to live their best eco-friendly lives. Here’s what I’m doing to shrink my negative impact on the environment—and how you can do it, too.

1. Trade paper for cloth

A friend suggested that if I was going to do this, I should make my first swap the low-hanging fruit, so to speak—towels. It’s now the first thing that I recommend people change, because it’s so easy. Paper towels are wrapped individually in plastic, and you can cut down a lot of waste by simply making the change to rags. Get a basket, and fill it with rags, old cloths, or even stained kids clothing. Keeping the basket accessible and in the kitchen makes this super easy. This small change led to us switching to cloth napkins, too. When it comes to making any change, I’ve found that it’s best to try one new thing until it becomes second nature, and then move on from there. You can’t do it all at once.

Saving money every month is an incredible perk of this journey. Check out these 20 simple ways to reduce waste—and save money every month.

2. Make zero-waste coffee

For beginners who are just starting out, switching up your coffee routine is another easy way to reduce plastic in your life. I can’t live without coffee, but I knew there had to be a way to make it without waste and plastic. I switched to a French press, and I buy the coffee loose and put it in a reusable cloth bag. There’s no waste this way, and you can compost it. It also tastes a lot better. It’s not just individuals like myself who are going plastic-free. These 22 big companies are getting rid of plastic for good.

3. Compost

For most of us, when we throw out our trash with food scraps, we toss it in a plastic bag first. If you compost instead, you can skip the plastic bag entirely. It reduces what goes to the landfill and reduces your overall trash. It’s one way to save plastic bags.

4. Brush away plastic

© Rostislav_Sedlacek/Getty Images

A lot of people don’t know that compostable toothbrushes exist. We use bamboo toothbrushes instead of plastic ones. And when we go to the dentist and the dentist offers us the free toothbrushes and floss, we politely decline. We can snap the heads off of our bamboo brushes (they contain nylon bristles) and toss them in the compost. You can also buy brushes with boar bristles that are completely compostable, but that’s too far, even for me. Going green doesn’t have to make life more difficult.

5. Opt for non-plastic dental floss

Another thing that most people don’t know about is silk dental floss. It can be composted, and you can find it at any health store. If you’d rather not floss, you can use a Waterpik. There are also toothpaste tablets that you chew instead of spreading on your brush, which saves you from using a plastic tube for application. I’ll admit that one takes some getting used to, especially if you like the creamy texture of traditional toothpaste.

6. Just say no to plastic bags at the grocery store

While some swaps have technically been easy, I find myself dealing with pushback from others, which, in turn, creates anxiety. For example, I shop at a supermarket with an in-house bakery. Every week, I ask the baker at the counter (always the same woman) to place my loaf in a repurposed pillowcase instead of a plastic bag. Although she and I have been dancing this dance for over two years, she continues to roll her eyes each and every time. I swear she works slower on purpose, too. Opting not to use plastic bags in situations like this is an important step, but it might not always be food-safe to skip bags altogether at the grocery store.

It’s also nearly impossible to find berries at the store that aren’t in a plastic clamshell container, which is made of a softer plastic that’s harder to recycle. So I decided to start growing my own blueberries and raspberries, and I freeze what I can.

7. Go green for baby

With my first daughter, I was too stressed about new motherhood to go with cloth diapers, but by the second, I was able to make the swap. It did make extra laundry, but I did it happily, knowing that we were saving so much money. Sometimes it isn’t even a matter of making a swap, but just saving everything you can instead of purchasing new. Hand-me-downs are great, especially if you have more than one child. Even if it’s a little bit worn, I’ll keep it. If I purchase something new, it’s going to be wrapped in plastic, so I don’t buy new as often as possible.

8. Use natural items as beauty products

The hardest swap so far has been using coconut oil as my makeup remover, especially for my eye makeup. It just doesn’t remove it completely or absorb well, and it doesn’t work well on my skin. I don’t love it, but I use it.

9. Skip that bottle of shampoo

© vintagerobot/Getty Images I made the swap from shampoo and conditioner in a bottle to one in a bar. It wasn’t an easy or quick process. I had to try several different bar brands, just like you would with bottled shampoo or conditioner. While some brands completely dried my hair out, others didn’t adequately address my oily-hair issue. Once I found one I liked, though, the swap became easy. A shampoo bar is smaller and easier to travel with than liquid shampoo, too. Not to mention, they last a really long time. Mine lasts for about 80 washes!

10. Be merciless in the medicine cabinet

I use bar soap instead of liquid, and there are bamboo cotton swabs instead of the plastic ones. My switch from liquid to bar soap was painless. I enjoy purchasing scented bars that are locally made, so they feel more luxurious than liquid soap. And even though they’re “fancy,” they’re still cheaper than soap in a bottle. It’s nice not having to refill pump bottles, too. There’s a swap for just about everything if you want to find one.

11. Try a different feminine-hygiene product

I switched from tampons to a silicone menstrual cup (silicone is a type of rubber, in case you’re wondering), and it’s changed my life. I’ve heard stories from other women who have had to try many, many brands of menstrual cups before finding one that’s comfortable. For me, the biggest issue was getting over the mental hurdle of using one. Once I committed myself to trying, I took a free quiz to help me determine which brand was right for my body, and then I purchased the one that the quiz suggested. I experienced easy and stress-free periods shortly after. I love that it’s so comfortable, too. I often forget I’m even wearing it! I honestly want to shout from the rooftops how easy this swap is.

Here are another 11 “disposables” you should stop buying now.

12. Ditch the plastic wrap

I had read online how to make my own beeswax wrap to cover food containers. This one was a fail for me, so I ended up buying a commercial beeswax wrap instead of making my own. If you do want to try it for yourself, you’ll need to paint melted wax on cotton and then let it dry. Once dry, you should be able to press the fabric down around the edges of your bowl, just like plastic wrap. It’s a great project for repurposed clothing. When I tried it myself, it wouldn’t stay on the bowl. The commercial brand I bought is great—you can use them hundreds of times. I wish I had done that from the start.

13. Cut down on convenience items

This is a tough area, especially with kids. Most people love the prepackaged snack options for kids’ lunches, and it makes sense because it’s so easy—especially when it comes to things like cheese sticks or bags of popcorn. I’ve found a way to do this, too, with a little creativity. I have the deli slice up a block of cheese into sticks, and then place them in a glass container I bring from home. I’ll also buy loose popcorn kernels, pop it at home, and then put the popcorn into silicone bags.

If you don’t know what to do with the plastic bags you’ve already accumulated, here’s the easiest way to recycle them.

14. Get rid of plastic food containers

Most people get hung up on food storage—but you shouldn’t. I switched out my Rubbermaid items for glass containers, even the ones I send with my kids to school. The little glass jars I send fruit in are pretty indestructible; we’ve had ours for about five years now. Glass wasn’t allowed at my daughter’s summer camp this year, so we sent stainless steel items for that instead. I prefer glass simply because I started this journey with it. I also saw how great glass is to freeze items in.

15. A final note on going plastic-free

© Courtesy Stephanie Seferian, The Sustainable Minimalists Podcast

I never really thought that I would make a difference or feel empowered by going plastic-free. But I feel like I’m doing all I can do to spread the word, and that gives me hope. I’m very fortunate to have a husband who’s on board; he takes glass containers and cloth napkins in his lunch to work. I expected people to write me off as a hippie when I started this, but when people see me doing strange things, like washing foil, they’re genuinely curious. It makes me think that if people know there’s a better way, they’ll want to go that direction. After all, this is a lifestyle that has multiple benefits. Check out these 13 ways green living can make you healthier.

Related video: Ditch your green grass for one of these alternative lawns (Provided by USA TODAY)