Ed Clark, Pioneering Abstract Expressionist Painter, Dies at 93 – The New York Times

He used a broom for the sense of speed and monumentality it imparted to his paintings. He hit on the idea as young artist living hand-to-mouth in Paris.

Image
Ed Clark at his home studio in Chelsea in 2014.CreditCreditChester Higgins Jr./The New York Times

Ed Clark, an African-American abstract painter who used a push broom and bold colors to allude to the natural world and at times to convey emotions about racial injustice, earning him belated international acclaim, died on Friday. He was 93 and lived in Detroit.

His death was announced by Hauser & Wirth, which represents Mr. Clark internationally and currently has an exhibition of his paintings from 2000 to 2013 on view in its Chelsea gallery through Oct. 26.

In a career that spanned seven decades, Mr. Clark became known for his experimentation with vibrant colors, paint application and medium — he was among the first painters in the postwar period to use a shaped canvas.

His stylistic signature was his technique of pushing a broom across the canvas, which allowed him to bring energy and movement to his work.

Mr. Clark’s paintings combined the emotionality of the Abstract Expressionists with the often cool factuality of the succeeding generation of Minimalist artists who emerged in the 1960s.

He is best known for his thick bands of buoyant colors spiked with white that were usually applied in broad horizontal swaths and sometimes conjured landscapes or architecture.

But his primary interests were in the materiality of paint, sense of speed and monumentality that the sweep of the broom imparted to his abstractions. He said he hit on this way of working when he was a young artist living hand-to-mouth in Paris and, in search of something wider than a painter’s brush, picked up a janitor’s boom.

He used it to push thick piles of paint across a canvas lying on the floor and it eventually became his preferred tool.

Mr. Clark emerged in New York in the late 1950s, after four years in Paris, and his work synthesized aspects of European and American postwar abstraction. Like many artists of his generation, he spoke admiringly of the work of Monet and Matisse, but he cited the galvanizing influence of his first encounter in Paris in 1952 with the slab-like paint surfaces of the French Russian-born painter Nicolas de Staël.

Ed Clark was born on May 6, 1926, in New Orleans to Edward Clark and Merion (Hutchinson) Clark and was raised there and in Baton Rouge, La., attending a Roman Catholic grammar school. His father made some money gambling, but his mother and relatives mostly supported the family, which included a younger sister named Shirley. When he was 7, the family moved to Chicago.

Mr. Clark, who drew from a young age, always knew he would be an artist and had a preternatural faith in his own talent. In 1944 he left high school and joined the Army Air Forces, serving in Guam for two years without seeing combat.

Upon his return he attended the Art Institute of Chicago on the G.I. Bill from 1947 to 1951, where his teacher Louis Rittman encouraged his painting.

In 1952, he went to Europe, also on the G.I. Bill. to study at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière. He became part of a group of African-American artists and writers who found, in Paris, inspiration and respite from discrimination that included Beauford Delaney, James Baldwin and Haywood Bill Rivers. But his friends also included white artists like Joan Mitchell, Sam Francis, Al Held and George Sugarman.

Mr. Clark arrived in Paris working in a figurative style, but within a year developed a Cubist-inflected style of abstraction dotted with bright colors that reflected de Staël’s influence.

As he had at the Art Institute, he conducted his education primarily by studying painting in museums, especially the Louvre, starting with Cézanne, although his palette also had a Renaissance lightness (a strong pink and a medium blue were favored hues).

In Paris he showed in several prestigious surveys, including the annual Salon d’Automne, and had his first solo shows at Galerie R. Creuze in 1955 and ’56, the year he returned to New York.

There he joined the exploding 10th Street art scene in Greenwich Village, helping to found Brata, an influential artists’ cooperative, in 1957.

That year, he exhibited a shaped painting in its Christmas group show that was closely studied by other artists. Shaped canvases would become an important hallmark of Minimalist painting in the 1960s. At the time, Mr. Clark started using elliptical paintings because he felt the shape was truer to the human field of vision.

In Manhattan, he frequented the Cedar Tavern, a popular gathering place for abstract artists and beatnik writers in Greenwich Village, mingling with the likes of Mark Rothko and Willem de Kooning. His friends included Mr. Whitten, Daniel LaRue Johnson, Yayoi Kusama and Donald Judd.

Mr. Clark had his first New York solo show at Brata in 1958 but did not have another solo there until 1971, when he exhibited paintings on the ground floor of Judd’s loft building in SoHo.

For years, it seemed, as he claimed to Mr. Whitten, no white dealers would exhibit his work, but he showed at galleries with nonwhite owners, like James Yu, Randall Gallery and G.R. N’Namdi and also in such New York nonprofits as the Lehman College Art Gallery and the Wilmer Jennings Gallery at Kenkeleba House. Throughout the years he exhibited widely abroad, including in Paris, where he had an exhibition at the American Embassy in 1969.

He traveled widely, returning to Paris for long intervals and also visiting Nigeria, Brazil, Cuba, Martinique, Mexico and China. Despite his devotion to abstraction, he felt that the light and space of each location affected his work unconsciously.

His art began to be more widely recognized in the United States in 2013, starting with a survey at the Art Institute of Chicago and an exhibition organized by the artist David Hammons at the Jack Tilton Gallery in New York that featured Mr. Clark’s work with individual pieces by Ms. Kusama, Judd and Mitchell.

This was followed by solos at the Jack Tilton Gallery in 2014, Mnuchin in 2018, also in New York, and the current exhibition at Hauser & Wirth. His work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Museum of Modern Art, the Studio Museum in Harlem and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture.

Mr. Clark disavowed any interest in what he called “black art,” situating himself in a field of abstraction nurtured by artists of all backgrounds. But his work had an unusual forcefulness, scale and autonomy that could convey an imperious pride and maybe something more. This possibility seems verified by a 1964 painting titled “Blacklash,” which, with a splatter of black paint that fanned against red and white, seems to signal racial anger.

Mr. Clark’s four marriages — to Muriel Nelson, Lola Owens, Hedy Durham and Liping An — ended in divorce. He is survived by Melcanca Clark, his daughter with Ms. Durham, and two grandchildren.

He painted well into his later years, stopping only when his strength began to fail.

“No matter what I do,” Mr. Clark said in a 2014 interview with The Times, “there’s not a day that I’m not an artist.”

Correction: 

Earlier versions of two picture captions with this article misstated the year they were taken. It was 2018, not 2014.

Roberta Smith, the co-chief art critic, regularly reviews museum exhibitions, art fairs and gallery shows in New York, North America and abroad. Her special areas of interest include ceramics textiles, folk and outsider art, design and video art. @robertasmithnyt

Neil Vigdor is a breaking news reporter on the Express Desk. He previously covered Connecticut politics for the Hartford Courant. @gettinviggyFacebook

Steal decor ideas from 20 HDB & BTO living rooms that are far from boring – AsiaOne

The living room is often the first thing that you see when you open the doors to your apartment, so it’ll definitely pay to spend a little more time to make it as welcoming as possible.

What’s more, when you’re entertaining friends or family members, the living room is often the perfect place for it so, it makes perfect sense to keep it looking great and potentially give it an open-concept.

From using lots of white to brighten up the living area to making it cosy with soft furnishings, we’ve got a whole bunch of living room ideas for small spaces right here!

1. USE AMPLE LIGHT

PHOTO: DistinctIdentity

This cosy living room has got all the right ingredients for a soothing night in – gentle hues, plush seating, ample lighting for reading, and vibrant accents to break the monochromatic monotony.

2. CLEVER STORAGE

PHOTO: Home & Decor 

This custom-design is a brilliant way to combine storage and seating space in the living room!

3. WARM SHADES

PHOTO: Mong Design Studio

Another way to put together calming décor for your flat is by using a palette of warm colours.

Here, the designer has used an assortment of shades including dark brown, cream, and white to pull together a space that’s both exquisite and inviting.

4. LOOK UP

PHOTO: Space Sense 

Neon lights and a slope false wall creates an edgy loft-style look.

5. IT’S ALL IN THE FURNITURE

PHOTO: Ehka Studio

Want a living room that can put you at ease as easily as your bedroom does?

Opt for a large, comfy day bed instead of a conventional sofa! We can’t think of a better way to enjoy Korean drama marathons than by vegging out on this lounger.

6. LUXE FOR LESS

PHOTO: Akihaus 

Brass inlays and marble-look tiles give this BTO home in Punggol a luxurious look.

7. BRING THE LIGHT IN

PHOTO: Fuse Concept Pte. Ltd. 

Sometimes, all you need to imbue a restful ambiance into your living room design is a healthy amount of natural light.

So if you’re blessed with a spacious balcony like this that doesn’t get the afternoon sun, it’ll be best to locate the living area next to it in order to enjoy as much of the light as possible.

8. LEAVE THE WALLS EMPTY

PHOTO: The Scientist 

The floor and walls are some of your biggest canvasses. Leave the wall clear from photographs and fixtures to make it look a little more spacious.

9. DESIGN THE SOFA AROUND THE LIVING ROOM

PHOTO: Benjeemen Heng I.D. 

A large, modern, and comfortable sofa design can certainly serve to anchor a living room that’s devoid of decoration.

Having a divider between the main entrance and living area also creates more privacy, allowing you make yourself as comfortable as you wish!

10. COSY COMFORTS

PHOTO: Black N White Home 

The designers created a faux fireplace to imbue the classical European look in this five-room Punggol home.

11. USE SYMMETRY 

PHOTO: Paper + White

Using symmetry in interior decorating is a classic method for framing and zoning spaces.

In this colonial black and white bungalow, the homeowner put together a semi-formal living room with facing sofas (perfect for entertaining) and a couple of accompanying vintage-inspired armchairs for an old world charm.

12. INDUSTRIAL ALWAYS WORKS 

PHOTO: Free Space Intent 

This three-room HDB maisonette features a hook-filled ceiling and lots of greenery.

13. CHOOSE FURNITURES WITH A THEME

PHOTO: Museum

If comfort and design are both important qualities that you’d like to have for your home, invest in good furniture.

Without even trying too hard, this living room appears effortlessly charming thanks to the owner’s mid-century designer furniture, which speaks for itself.

14. WOOD WOULD

PHOTO: TLD Design

The homeowners of this dark-hued BTO flat centred their design around a long wooden dining table they found at Crate & Barrel.

15. REMEMBER TEXTURES

PHOTO: Box. ID Studio

Need decorating ideas for a narrow living room? Using an all-white base is a good place to start.

But you’d want a cosy – not clinical – home, so remember to bring in soft textures such as suede, and calming materials like wood to fill the space with warmth.

16. GIVE THE FEATURE WALL AN UPGRADE

PHOTO: Fuse Concept 

Here’s one way to incorporate a concrete wall at home without going too cold or bare.

17, MOODY CHIC

PHOTO: Rezt & Relax Interior 

To create a chic, moody living room, use a variation of sensuous shades like purple, black, and greys.

Curved, organic silhouettes also add softness to the area.

18. USE WALLPAPER

PHOTO: Space Sense

This weathered wood-look wallpaper gives concrete screed a run for its money.

Plus, wallpapers can be a lot cheaper than painting your home.

19. KEEP IT CLUTTER-FREE

PHOTO: ID Emboss Pte. Ltd.

In order to put your mind completely at rest, it’s important to have as little visual clutter as possible.

That’s why this clean cut, minimalist home appears absolutely inviting without having to try too hard.

20. GIVE YOUR LIVING ROOM A THEME

PHOTO: The Scientist 

Dried flowers and vintage posters complement this rustic-style living room.

This article was first published in Home & Decor

After criticism, pot packaging tries to go greener – The Province


Customers show off their purchases upon leaving the B.C. Cannabis Store in Kamloops on Oct. 17, 2018, the first day that marijuana became legal in Canada. RICHARD LAM / PNG

Criticism has been levelled against cannabis producers for using excessive packaging. Now retailers say things are changing.

Excessive packaging remains a problem one year after cannabis was legalized, but retailers say change is on the horizon.

Consumers criticized the often multi-layered and single-use packaging of plastic, paper and cardboard for even small quantities of weed.

Greenpeace Canada is also speaking out on what it says is a “missed opportunity” in the battle against plastics and single-use disposables.

“It’s unfortunate that the federal government and provinces are working together on a zero-waste strategy, but can’t create a better model for products they’re responsible for,” said Sarah King, Greenpeace Canada’s head of oceans and plastics campaign. “They could have piloted a model that is more sustainable.”

Licensed producers are responsible for packaging, which has to follow Health Canada requirements, including being designed to show any signs of tampering, to be child-resistant and to prevent contamination and keep the product dry. The packages also have to be large enough to accommodate required labelling information, including the type of product, THC and CBD levels, and mandatory warnings.

B.C. retailers, which receive cannabis products already packaged from producers through the B.C. Liquor Distribution Branch, often bear the brunt of customers’ complaints about excessive packaging.

“They feel it’s completely crazy that this packaging is in our stores, and they get pretty upset, and we have nothing — we don’t have a great solution for them,” said Harrison Stoker, VP of brand and culture at the Donnelly Group, which operates three Hobo cannabis stores in B.C.

Retailers say that in the face of stringent federal regulations, and in the rush to market last year, licensed producers took the path of least resistance, defaulting to disposable plastics.

Some of the product is laid out at Hobo Recreational Cannabis on Granville Street in Marpole. Jason Payne / PNG

But now more producers are making an effort to use sustainable packaging, while still complying with the Cannabis Act.

“There’s some new manufacturers of more environmental-friendly substrates coming into the market,” said Stoker, noting packaging from suppliers from Colorado and California, where the recreational cannabis market is more mature, is starting to be used in B.C.

He also hopes that new products such as edibles, infusions and concentrates, which are to hit the legal market later this year, will have more sustainable packaging.

“We will see a change coming us as (licensed producers) start reacting more genuinely to public sentiment and this environmental snafu.”

Geoff Dear, president of Muse Cannabis, which operates a store in South Granville, said the packaging is evolving. Muse had been passing on consumer concerns to producers, which have been “receptive,” said Dear.

“Some vendors are improving on it. Every so often, you’ll see a product come in a new and improved packaging,” he said, citing B.C.-based Tantalus Labs as an example of a company using more “minimalist” packaging.

Most items in cannabis packaging are accepted in residential blue bin recycling programs, but not all.

Geoff Dear of Muse, a marijuana dispensary in South Granville. Alastair Bird / PNG

Muse and Hobo offer in-store recycling bins offered by Ontario-based Tweed and TerraCycle where customers can drop off discarded cannabis packaging, which are then collected and transformed into plastic pellets.

In a statement, Health Canada said the federal government recognizes plastic pollution is a growing problem.

The regulations permit “wrappers and peel back-type labels as well as flexibility for packaging materials other than plastics” such as cardboard, it said.

“Health Canada encourages the use of innovative and environmentally sound packaging approaches, provided the requirements in the regulations are satisfied.”

King acknowledged the challenge producers face in meeting Health Canada regulations, but says they can still meet those requirements while being greener.

She suggested industry and government implement a reusable packaging deposit scheme that allows consumers to return used packaging to stores, where they can be sanitized, refilled and resold.

“A lot of people that use cannabis already have more a more environmentally-, socially-responsible mindset,” she said. “It didn’t come as a surprise that people would be pushing back against the packaging and feel disappointed in what their options are.”

chchan@postmedia.com

twitter.com/cherylchan

After criticism, pot packaging tries to go greener – Canada.com

Criticism has been levelled against cannabis producers for using excessive packaging. Now retailers say things are changing.

Customers show off their purchases upon leaving the B.C. Cannabis Store in Kamloops on Oct. 17, 2018, the first day that marijuana became legal in Canada. RICHARD LAM / PNG

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Excessive packaging remains a problem one year after cannabis was legalized, but retailers say change is on the horizon.

Consumers criticized the often multi-layered and single-use packaging of plastic, paper and cardboard for even small quantities of weed.

Greenpeace Canada is also speaking out on what it says is a “missed opportunity” in the battle against plastics and single-use disposables.

“It’s unfortunate that the federal government and provinces are working together on a zero-waste strategy, but can’t create a better model for products they’re responsible for,” said Sarah King, Greenpeace Canada’s head of oceans and plastics campaign. “They could have piloted a model that is more sustainable.”

Licensed producers are responsible for packaging, which has to follow Health Canada requirements, including being designed to show any signs of tampering, to be child-resistant and to prevent contamination and keep the product dry. The packages also have to be large enough to accommodate required labelling information, including the type of product, THC and CBD levels, and mandatory warnings.

B.C. retailers, which receive cannabis products already packaged from producers through the B.C. Liquor Distribution Branch, often bear the brunt of customers’ complaints about excessive packaging.

“They feel it’s completely crazy that this packaging is in our stores, and they get pretty upset, and we have nothing — we don’t have a great solution for them,” said Harrison Stoker, VP of brand and culture at the Donnelly Group, which operates three Hobo cannabis stores in B.C.

Retailers say that in the face of stringent federal regulations, and in the rush to market last year, licensed producers took the path of least resistance, defaulting to disposable plastics.

Some of the product is laid out at Hobo Recreational Cannabis on Granville Street in Marpole. Jason Payne / PNG

But now more producers are making an effort to use sustainable packaging, while still complying with the Cannabis Act.

“There’s some new manufacturers of more environmental-friendly substrates coming into the market,” said Stoker, noting packaging from suppliers from Colorado and California, where the recreational cannabis market is more mature, is starting to be used in B.C.

He also hopes that new products such as edibles, infusions and concentrates, which are to hit the legal market later this year, will have more sustainable packaging.

“We will see a change coming us as (licensed producers) start reacting more genuinely to public sentiment and this environmental snafu.”

Geoff Dear, president of Muse Cannabis, which operates a store in South Granville, said the packaging is evolving. Muse had been passing on consumer concerns to producers, which have been “receptive,” said Dear.

“Some vendors are improving on it. Every so often, you’ll see a product come in a new and improved packaging,” he said, citing B.C.-based Tantalus Labs as an example of a company using more “minimalist” packaging.

Most items in cannabis packaging are accepted in residential blue bin recycling programs, but not all.

Geoff Dear of Muse, a marijuana dispensary in South Granville. Alastair Bird / PNG

Muse and Hobo offer in-store recycling bins offered by Ontario-based Tweed and TerraCycle where customers can drop off discarded cannabis packaging, which are then collected and transformed into plastic pellets.

In a statement, Health Canada said the federal government recognizes plastic pollution is a growing problem.

The regulations permit “wrappers and peel back-type labels as well as flexibility for packaging materials other than plastics” such as cardboard, it said.

“Health Canada encourages the use of innovative and environmentally sound packaging approaches, provided the requirements in the regulations are satisfied.”

King acknowledged the challenge producers face in meeting Health Canada regulations, but says they can still meet those requirements while being greener.

She suggested industry and government implement a reusable packaging deposit scheme that allows consumers to return used packaging to stores, where they can be sanitized, refilled and resold.

“A lot of people that use cannabis already have more a more environmentally-, socially-responsible mindset,” she said. “It didn’t come as a surprise that people would be pushing back against the packaging and feel disappointed in what their options are.”

chchan@postmedia.com

twitter.com/cherylchan

Fashion Brand KROST Teams Up With Eden Restoration Projects – Papermag

Back in August, news of the wildfires that devastated parts of the Amazon rainforest spread all over social media. Everyone from luxury fashion conglomerates to sitting presidents vowed to take action through financial support. However, our forests are still burning, with nearly 20,000 fire outbreaks last month in the Brazilian part of the Amazon alone.

The fashion industry, which is facing its own set of problems, has had to react and make the health of our planet a priority. Samuel Krost, founder of minimalist luxury brand KROST, risen to the challenge thanks to his business model of partnering with non-profit organizations with each collection.

His first outing saw him partner with March for Our Lives in the wake of the shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. For his second collection, which sets out to bring awareness to climate change, KROST has committed to donating a fraction of their proceeds to the Eden Restoration Projects in order to plant 10,000 trees.

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The EDEN capsule, designed by creative director Scott Camaran, features interchangeable blazers and cargo pants in a palette of earth tones and greens. Eden Restoration Projects describes itself as an organization whose mission is to provide fair wage employment to impoverished communities, who will grow, plant, and guard trees on a large scale.

“The most important thing for this brand is to stand for something and to give that message context through our product,” said Krost in a statement. “The goal of this collection is to remind the people of this world of what once was and the dangers we’re now experiencing through climate change and the risk of leaving only a mere shadow of the planet we once knew for those who come after us.”

The collection is available now at KrostNewYork.com. The cargo pants retail for $250 while the blazers retail for $395.

Photos Courtesy of Riley Smoller